Equally Shared Parenting - Half the Work ... All the Fun



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Here's where we keep you updated on news about parenting as it relates to division of responsibilities, career versus home decisions, work/life balance, and legislative and grass-roots movements toward equality or better choices for families. We'll also throw in our opinions of life as equal parents in a nonequal world, regardless of what's in the news.

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Equality Blog

Thursday, December 11, 2008

Naturally Involved Dads

Who says fathers who share (or dominate) the nurturing of their babies aren't doing what nature intended? Equally sharing parents have a lot in common with these animal dads:
  • Emperor penguins - if you've seen March of the Penguins, you know what I mean.
  • Marsupial frogs - dad watches the eggs hatch and then helps the tadpoles wriggle along his back until they enter pouches on his hips where they live for a few weeks and grow into frogs.
  • Seahorses - mom deposits eggs into a pouch on dad's abdomen, where they are fertilized. Dad then carries the embryos to term, nourishing and then birthing them from the pouch.
  • Hardhead catfish - dad carries the eggs in his mouth for 60 days until they hatch.
  • Marmosets - dad is the primary parent who carries, feeds and grooms the infants after their first few weeks of life, and may assist mom during birth by grooming and licking the newborns.

Just some fun food for thought.

2 Comments:

Anonymous Medela said...

That's quite an information, I was not aware of it, I always thought only female species can give birth, I was so wrong, thank you very much for the heads up!

11:05 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is great! Very informative. I hope more people read it. Thank you.

9:32 PM  

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